Henry Moore Foundation – Sculpture Photography

A while ago, I visited the Henry Moore Foundation, previously home to Henry Moore himself. For those of you that don’t know, Henry Moore was a sculptor, who’s large-scale artworks have been displayed all over the world. During his lifetime he was commonly commissioned to make sculptures for town squares, and public spaces. After his death, his home was converted into the Foundation, which is now open to the public.

His work is displayed around the spacious gardens surrounding his home. The size of this land is notable – Moore bought a lot of it, expanding the borders of his originally owned plot of land. I enjoyed photography his work, seeing how it blended into the landscape, something unnatural being placed into a natural environment. Except for the first one (which is in fact an immitation, and not Moore’s work), his sculptures are smooth, fluid, and blend into their location as if they had grown from it. Here are the first set of photos:

DSCF0744

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0750

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0753

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c) – BREAKDOWN BELOW

DSCF0754

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0757

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0755

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0768

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0770

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

DSCF0777

Sculpture’s in the Garden of Henry Moore – Taken by YellowJane (c)

 

Moore’s House is also open to be viewed. Unfortunately the interior was not open to photography, but I photographed and studied the exterior, and did view the inside of the house. Inside, the clutter and large amount of collectible items is staggering! Although Henry Moore and his wife were not keen travelers (an illusion which you could easily fall for, seeing the amount of exotic artwork he owned) , they were committed attendants to auctions, where they collected many goods and pieces of art, which are stored in cabinets, on shelves, on the wall, and on the uneven coffee tables of his home, filling every room. This was a house that could only have been lived in by artists, and intellectuals.

Here are my photos of the exterior of his home. I felt it was a cottage in appearance, particularly being fond of the greenhouses adorning the outside! Very cozy, yet intelligent at the same time, if a house can be intelligent!

Henry Moore's House - Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore’s House – Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore's House - Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore’s House – Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore's House - Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore’s House – Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore's House - Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore’s House – Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore's House - Taken by YellowJane (c)

Henry Moore’s House – Taken by YellowJane (c)

Finally, I focused on my favorite model, and did the photography version of a detailed breakdown. This model, appearing so simple from a distance, had countless angles. These photos are just a tiny selection of the possible views and different impressions you could get from this soaring, flowing, endless sculpture. Large in scale, framing what you see through it.

Model Breakdown - Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown – Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown - Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown – Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown - Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown – Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown - Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown – Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown - Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown – Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown - Photography by YellowJane (c)

Model Breakdown – Photography by YellowJane (c)

I hope you like my photographs! I have started an official Flickr account:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/126351903@N05/

Still getting to grips with that, and only uploaded a few batches of photos so far. Thanks, and have a lovely day!

Berlin ~ Photography and Discovery

Before anything, I must say sorry for not updating with my latest photography and other creative work recently! My exams have limited my time more than I ever thought they would, and as a result? No posts appeared here for over a month. So if anyone has hung around to read this – thanks!

Today I’m going to show some photography work I took in Berlin, Germany, when I went to stay there for three days in March. I focused particularly on Suburban Nature, and therefore took photos accordingly.

Berlin is surprisingly green. With less population than London, you do not get the same feeling of chaos that you get on the tube in Rush Hour England. It’s cleaner, and in many ways far more organised than London ever could hope to be. One thing I noticed is the zebra crossings, how people wait even when no cars drive by. In England they’d be off the pavement and running across the road at once, but not here!

It was Spring, and so all the beautiful trees and plantlife which decorate the city were that lovely bright shade of green: fresh, and young. The bark was dark, charcoal black, almost. A very unusual and actually unique combination.

Here are the first set of photographs which I feel show what I’ve just said about nature in Berlin:

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Wall Ivy

As you can see, the colours are just fascinating: strong, vibrant, sharp, and really echo the feeling of suburbia. And it was this that spurred onto a second interest: Suburban Nature.

I liked it: I loved the way man clashed with the natural world, and how here, in Berlin, it was SO noticeable. There was no effort to hold it back, or constrain it, it was all here, like decoration, adorning each and every concrete block, and changing it into something more. So I examined the buildings, and came across some good example of how nature mixed with man. Here are some further photos illustrating this:

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Submersion The Courtyard Cage or Frame?

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

When I travelled across the city, to the very contrasting East Berlin, ex-communist area of the city, it was yet more noticeable. The history showed through powerfully, in the buildings, in the cleanliness, in the graffiti on every wall. But on the most part that’s a different story to tell. Here, Suburban Nature was also very strong, in a slightly different way: more weed-based nature, than otherwise: more as if it wasn’t meant to be there, it just hadn’t been cut back yet. Here are the photos of Suburban Nature in East Berlin:

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Now, finally, my last, and questionably favorite photo taken in Berlin. This photo shows many little homes, all of which are shed-like dwellings situated along the side of a railway line, seemingly occupied at least some of the time. At first I had no idea why they were there, but using some inside-knowledge of a friend, I was able to understand that these sheds act as allotments, and gardens, for those who live in apartments. They own their own little garden, and come here to enjoy Summer. Occasionally, even if against the law, they stay here in Summer, and that’s why the sheds are questionably “homely”.

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Taken by Yellow Jane (c)

Berlin was fascinating: an amazing city. I highly recommend visiting for anyone who’s in the area. Got questions? Feel free to contact me using the tab at the top. Same applies if you’re interested in buying any of the photos in this post. These photos are mine, and if you decide to share anywhere else (i.e. Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, wherever) I expect full credit to be given to me and my blog. Thank you! I hope you enjoyed the post!

~Yellow Jane~

Exploring Natural Form (#2)

Been a while since I took these, but want to share them all the same.  Last time, I took pictures of ‘natural form’ in black and white. Today I’m sharing with you a similar process, but in colour. I really went for the Macro Photography options this time. And using some reflectors I was able to get really strong colours. I focused on fruit: the colour, texture, and patterns the subjects made. They turned out to be truly fascinating! Here are my first set of decent photographs:

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

As you can see, I used a variety of subjects in my photos: fruits, flowers, and other plants. But the common theme of Natural Form meant I could link them all. I was actually really pleased with these photos and in A Level Terms, they got me an A for these double pages alone, so that’s good too. You may be wondering how I did the reflector part of this?

Well.

I don’t have a studio to do all this in, so what I did is I placed the subject on the windowsill, during the day when lots of light was available, and zoomed in really close to the subject. I then used a sheet of white card, placing it on the windowsill, facing the sun, next to the subject. This meant all the light from the window was beamed directly onto the objects I was trying to photograph, giving me a good, strong, and most importantly even light for me to see by. It worked well, I think!

I hope you like the photos, and remember: if anyone has any questions about anything in the post, you are free to contact me in the Contact Me box at the top of the page! Thank you, and have a lovely Sunday, all. I hope you like the photographs.

~Yellow Jane~

 

Exploring Natural Form Photoshoot

Recently I have been studying ‘Natural Form’ for my A Level Photography. I thought a good starting point would be to look at the work of Karl Blossfeldt, a German Photographer who is now long gone. When responding to Blossfeldt’s work, it was important to keep it Black and White because not only did it match that style of working, but it also, I thought, revealed a lot about the shape and the structure of the formations I looked at. I photographed shells, leaves, wood, and other various forms of plant life. Here are the first set of pictures:

Click on the photos if you wish to enlarge them.

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

 

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

As you can see, I really tried to focus on the detail here. It was only shortly after these that I discovered how fascinating the skeleton of a leaf was. Conveniently enough, I had one in a frame, on my fridge. So down it came, and I looked at it some more! Here is the dead leaf photoshoot:

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

I was so happy with them it was slightly scary for those in the near vicinity. The detail I found through the fine structure was incredible: nothing like I imagined the foundations to look. But as Andy Small once said: the macro lens is a transport to another world. Looks like he was right!

However I still saw room for improvement. The next stage was to erase the shadows from the background of the earlier photos. Looking at Blossfeldt’s work, the background was strikingly white and pristine, whereas mine had the shadow of the plant. So here are the second responses to my work, all laid out nicely. Some are of the same objects, others are different: it was all a process of trial and error:

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

Taken by YellowJane (c)

The difference is obvious: check how the background compares. I am very happy to say I eliminated the shadows! The fern in particular is perfect: clear, sharp subject; pristine, clean background. If you’re wondering what I did, well you’re in luck, because I am going to tell you.

First, it’s the lighting. Shine some lights over or underneath the object, preferably more than one. If you have a light on every side it almost eliminates the shadow, as well as making the background (which, by the way, is nothing more than a sheet of white paper) more bright and.. Well: white!

Second, is raising the subject away from the background. If the subject is on the white, the shadow is directly beneath it, no matter how light you’re attacking it with. If it is lifted, even by your own hands, away from that background, the shadow is spread to far, and maybe will vanish all together! So it is after all, quite simple. Without Photoshop, to eliminate them, either.

If you are interested in purchasing or using any of the above photos, please contact me at the top of the blog, on the page labelled ‘Contact Me’. Please do not copy or take these photos or short tutorial, and do not claim them as your own. Thank you!

Have a lovely day, all.

~Yellow Jane~

Quick Update About This Blog

Hello there!

Just wanted to let you know about the few changes I made, in case anyone is interested.

1) You can now contact me from here. Check the menu *pokes bar at the top* and you can send me a message. If you’re interested, you can even buy my photography and/or artwork, through here.

2) Edited the followers bar slightly. Just to let you know you must type your email address here, to follow!

3) Updated Who Are You section. Just to get things accurate! You can now find all my other sites through this one.

That’s all, so thank you!
Have a lovely weekend.

~Yellow Jane~

What If..?

Yesterday I was thinking about chance. I have always found it quite interesting about how if one thing happened, that could trigger something else. Or if one simple thing happened, you could change your life! I believe it can affect everyone, too. I wouldn’t have been born if a certain chain of important events hadn’t occurred!

My grandmother met my grandfather from chance. She met a young couple whilst on holiday, and after the trip ended, they exchanged numbers. However, they BOTH lost the contact details for each other, and it looked like they wouldn’t see each other again. So one day my grandmother was shopping, and turned down a different streets she didn’t normally go down, for a forgotten reason. She also stopped for two minutes to look in a shop window. She looked around and saw someone spinning a walking cane in a very distinctive way. Low and behold, it was the couple she had met on holiday! Not only had they come to London, but they had bumped into each other, by chance, on a street she wouldn’t normally be in, made late by a shop window. She could have missed them. They introduced my grandparents! They had my mum… My mum had me! I would not have existed without that happening.

And this is just one example, one out of a long list, I am sure. Right place, right time, right situation, late, early, on time… It all makes a difference. My dad was friends with a man who worked in the Twin Towers. He worked on a floor above the point where the plain crashed, but he survived. The only one who did, too. You know why? Because he was out! His mother had bought a blue shirt for his birthday. She said: “I wasn’t sure if you wanted green or blue. But  I had to make a quick decision, so here’s the receipt for if you wish to change it!” That decision was made in a split second choice: “blue? green? blue.” He decided to change it for the green one, and was out when it happened. He survived 9/11 because his mother bought the wrong shirt. That’s incredible if anything is!

The idea of this post occurred to me yesterday when driving home from London, where we’d been with the same grandmother (now 77) who was in the first little tale. Like you do, I left my Russian homework at her house. She rung, and we had to turn back. We had to return to fetch it, and when we got back to the point we’d been about to reach when she’d phoned, a car had crashed. Mashed, it was. The bonnet flattened, and several cars stopped with their hazards on. My dad estimated it had happened fifteen minutes back, as police were just arriving. We’d have been there at the time, if I hadn’t left something behind.

Now obviously, there is no evidence whatsoever that I would’ve been involved in a car accident. I could have missed it by a minute either side. But it makes you think, doesn’t it? What if… What if we’d driven by, and their car had begun to spin. What if it spun into a space that COULD have been occupied by us? No one was hurt. But if we’d been there, it could have been different. And it would have all been based on whether I left a folder at my grandmother’s house, or remembered to bring it back first time. See what I mean?

And that, guys, is why there is no such thing as travelling to the future. Because everything is spontaneous, and cannot be planned in advance. It isn’t possible: life is too full of surprises, last minute changes, spur of the moment decisions, and coincidences!

Thanks for reading!

~Yellow Jane~

The Watch – Photoshoot

 

Time for a photo blog! About a week or two ago, I was lucky enough to be able to borrow a family heirloom – a watch – from a friend of my sister’s. She wanted it photographed so she could paint it, and being an A Level Photography Student myself, she asked me to take them!

Here are the photos (or the best selection of them!):

I hope this works: I have not uploaded photos to WordPress before. All our taken by me, and the right are mine too. Please no stealing. :o)

However, if you are interested in purchasing a print, this is possible by contacting me.

These photos have been edited slightly, using my (admittedly small) knowledge of Photoshop to create a more vivid photo, and enhance the colours. The watch is a Jewish Watch, and you may notice the numbers are in Hebrew!

Please let me know what you think. Feel free to comment below! Happy Christmas, everyone.

~Yellow Jane~

Why Lying Is Good For You :o)

Hello universe! I need to begin by saying: I’m not going to lie to you (which is ironic, considering the post title), so I need to apologise for not writing anything for ages. I’ve had a lot of troubles with Blogger, and then transferring everything to WordPress etc. So all in all, I’ve contributed nothing to this for a good couple of months. I am hoping to get back to it, although will only have the time at weekend. I hope you like my new blog!

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anyway. Why lying is good for you. Possibly a slightly controversial topic, if ever there was one. My point is, that if we never lied, the world wouldn’t function as it does. Because actually, it struck me that we lie everyday! Example:

“How are you?” – “Fine!” Well that’s a lie. We tend to always say fine. In fact, the person who asked may be a little surprised if the response they got went along the lines of: “Well today I have work and I’m stressed and I’m tired and although I’m looking forward to watching a film tonight with my wife I am worried she’ll notice I forgot to shave this morning.” Because that’s what’s really going on inside their heads! Lying in this case, is good. it avoids many an awkward situation: would you agree?

I think we also lie in arguments. “I HATE YOU!” screams the daughter to her mother. “I HATE YOU TOO!” screams the mother back. Is this true, on either half? Maybe at the time, but in the long run, I don’t believe it is. Yet if they didn’t lie, then all the negative emotions and tensions inside them would remain, and possibly cause bigger problems, like them waiting to say those words until a time when they would have caused long-term hurt.

We lie to convenience ourselves. “Did you do the washing up?” – “No, I didn’t get a chance.” This sounds a lot better than: “Nah, cba.” or “To be honest, darling, I just forgot.” But it avoids the embarrassment all round! And the avoiding embarrassment is also a good point to bring in the lying techniques! See here:

Posh London Mother: “We’re going to Spain this Summer, my dear. Where are you off to?” Less Well Off Mother from Who-Knows-Where: “Nowhere, we decided to stay at home this summer!” I mean seriously: how awkward would it be if she said: “Actually we’re poor, so we can’t afford to go on holiday this Summer.”

Furthermore, we must bare in mind we must lie to children 24/7. Don’t worry, I’m not going to start on the whole romance thing. But how many times have you heard of the special cuddle talk? A bit more than: “I just told my six year old how me and Steve went and -” *ahem* Also, if we didn’t lie to kids, then they would end up frightened and scared. I support lying to children, odd as that sounds. I would never say to a kid: “You want the truth? You’re gonna grow up, and have to live on your own. You’re gonna have to get a job, fend, feed, wash for yourself, because if you don’t, you’ll be on the streets kid. You’re gonna die cold, and alone, and hungry. Because that’s how harsh life can be to some people. And you know about war, right?” etc. The poor things would never sleep again, unless we lied to them!

So my point is, lying is used all the time. I obviously don’t support it as in a more serious situation. “Do you love me?” “Yes.” when in fact he wants to say “No and I will dump you tomorrow!”. And it’s pointless to lie about the over-obvious. “It snows in Summer.” *facepalm*

But we must bare in mind how necessary it is. So don’t let this encourage you to lie, but let it be as another insight into language in general. It is one of my interests: linguistics, and how language works. How we use it everyday! It’s fascinating, and lying is part of that, frankly. I hope you enjoyed the blog. Feel free to comment below. I even encourage you to post back if you disagree! I love to hear feedback and opinions :o)

Have a lovely weekend!

~Yellow Jane~

It’s a Rainbow!

I have been testing out a new camera lens. SO excuse the rather dodgy pictures, as they are circled with the lens which I put on backwards and didn’t set the focus to 100%. But I just wanted to share here these rainbow photos and see what anyone thought of them :)
 
I learned quickly that this lens does give some great effects and I’m looking forward to practising it out more and seeing just how much I can do! If you point it at the sun like in photo one, you get a whole blast, like a firework.
 
Whereas if the light just catches you at a glance, especially if you’re behind a tree, you get a beautiful shimmering effect like in photo two!
 
Mainly I posted to warn you there is another (better!) photography post coming with a whole range of my photos from Tarr Steps, in black and white.
 
 
I hope you like my photos!
 

 
~Yellow Jane~

The Mermaid

So… I apologise for the lack of activity. I am currently on holiday! I thought I would share my latest piece of artwork here. It has taken me ages to complete, and I’m very happy with the end result:
 

Why did I draw a mermaid? No reason. Just felt like it :) It was drawn with fineliner pens, over a basic 2-D pencil outline of the shapes of the figure and rock she is sitting on.

If you look closely (sorry the picture is quite small) you may see a tear in her eye. There is also a small scratch on her arm, and on the point of the rock to the left hand side, there is a locket hanging from the rock. My idea was that she was in love with a sailor, who gave her the locket, but now has to leave. They argued and she was cut, and now she sits on the rock weeping for him….
It’s also meant to be night time, because of the stars, and the reasonably dark sky. So that’s it I suppose, I really hope you like her!

Yellow Jane